Tuesday, 27 October 2015

Family Millions - Trove Tuesday

Over the years there have been many articles published about money languishing in chancery, waiting for families to make a claim. In 1913 from the following paragraph from the Windsor & Richmond Gazette mentioned money in chancery and how it affected some Hawkesbury families:
We are told that several millions of money now in Chancery are shortly to be claimed, and that a number, of Hawkesbury families will be beneficiaries. The families interested are the Hobbses, Of Forrester; Mrs. Sullivan, senr., of Wilberforce; the family of the late Joshua Jones, the Bootles, of Pitt Town, and others. A representative, goes to England early next year to claim the enormous fortune.
During the 1920s hundreds of articles appeared in newspapers all over Australia. The following example compiled by George Reeve, a local historian who often wrote historical based articles, shows how useful these types of articles can be, providing names , places and dates. Check out The story of Robert Hobbs 
The story of Robert Hobbs (1926, May 28). Windsor & Richmond Gazette p. 6

There was even correspondence from New Zealand. In 1928 several letters were published from Mr G. A. Hobbs from Foxton, New Zealand in the Windsor & Richmond Gazette. In 1931 it was recorded that there were at least "360 claimants to the Hobbs millions" and there were "several unsuccessful attempts to secure the fortune."  In the UK newspapers reported similar instances, including Lancashire Evening Post - Thursday 30 July 1931. There was information about the Rose Millions published in 1925.

In the Yorkshire Post & Leeds Intelligencer 25 August 1930, Australian descendants of the Hobbs and Rose families pooled £3,000 to send representatives to England to claim the fortune. The Rose Millions was apparently worth £25,000,000 and the Hobbs £8,000,000. The applicants claimed the “Roses’s mother was a Lady-in-waiting to Queen Charlotte, and that John Rose was a natural son of George III. They allege that George III, left extensive property in various English counties in trust for John Rose.” It was “claimed on behalf of the Hobbs claimants that John Rose married Harriet Hobbs.”

In 1925 George Reeve wrote about the Ebenezer pioneers and the Everingham fortune. Again during the next few decades, hundreds of articles were published in various Australian newspapers, including the following:
Everingham Millions (1929, October 4). Windsor & Richmond Gazette, p. 11

As well as the Hobbs, Everinghams, there was also  the Clarks Millions in 1927 and the Brewers Mystery Millions the same year. In 1929 there was talk of changing the Everingham Millions to the Chaseling Millions. There was also the Green Millions and of particular interest to my own family, the Jennings Millions in 1929.

The publishing of information about these supposed fortunes often provide fascinating information for family historians. Over the years, these stories have gripped generations and despite some of the untruths, they are an amazing read.

9 comments:

  1. Looks like these tales are the grand parents of the scam emails we now get in our in boxes. Or do we believe the millions are real. Whatever the truth the stories are fascinating, like you say. Enjoyed your #trovetuesday post. Fran

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks Michelle - being a direct line descendant of Robert Hobbs & Bridget Eslin/Heslin I have heard these stories most of my younger life. I have been documenting letters and newspaper articles for some years now and thanks to Trove it has made it so much easier to find more interesting stories. Another descendant who had strong links to the McKenzies who went back to England in an attempt to claim the millions, is also doing likewise. I would love that one day these documents can find a place at the Windsor Library along with Robert's gold seals to be preserved for future generations. Whether the story is true or not, there was an estate but not as grandeurs as many would have liked it to be ... and none of the descendants here in Australia ever benefited from it. Anyone wishing to learn more are invited to attend the Hobbs Family Reunion on 31st October 2015 at the Richmond School of Arts in Richmond NSW 10 am - 3 pm

    ReplyDelete
  3. Can't you find some for my family?

    ReplyDelete
  4. So funny that two of Jill's selected posts this week are about the same individual/famiily line to which I am connected! Bev I would have loved to attend the reunion yesterday. I saw your ad in Family Tree Connections only a couple of weeks ago. My life is a bit manic at the moment so I wasn't able to arrange anything at the last minute. I hope it went really well and you all had a great time. Would have loved to have been there.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Alex, it would be great if we could find a connection..Jill, any Hobbs or Eslin/Hesln? Surely we can find some way to make you an honorary Hobbs. The reunion was great fun, thanks in no small part to Bev Woodman's great organisation and tireless work on behalf of the numerous Hobbs descendants...all of whom are very appreciative...

    ReplyDelete
  6. I haven't found Hobbs or Eslins but my Phipps, Westbrooks and Magicks may have been friends and neighbours.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I haven't found Hobbs or Eslins but my Phipps, Westbrooks and Magicks may have been friends and neighbours.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I haven't found Hobbs or Eslins but my Phipps, Westbrooks and Magicks may have been friends and neighbours.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hello... My name is John Kenneth Hobbs. I would like to see about my connection to Robert Hobbs and John Hobbs. Please contact me @jhobbs503@outlook.com

    ReplyDelete